News Releases

IU President Whitten's Inauguration Watch Party at IU East

Posted October 22, 2021

Supplied Photo:  IU President Pamela Whitten
IU's 19th President Pamela Whitten will be inaugurated on November 4.
Photo by Indiana University

Indiana University East welcomes the community to participate in a watch party and celebration of the inauguration of its first female president, Pamela Whitten, Indiana University's 19th president.

  • WHAT: Autumn Festival and 19th IU President Pamela Whitten Inauguration Watch Party
  • WHEN: Thursday, November 4, 2021, at 2:30 p.m. The inauguration procession begins at 2:45 p.m. and the ceremony begins at 3 p.m.
  • WHO: IU and IU East alumni, faculty, staff, students, community, and members of the media are welcome to attend.
  • WHERE: Indiana University East, 2325 Chester Blvd., Richmond, Indiana. The event will take place in the Whitewater Hall Lobby. Visitor parking is available in the Whitewater Hall parking lot.
  • ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: IU President Pamela Whitten was named the 19th IU President on April 16, 2021, by the IU Board of Trustees. She officially began July 1, 2021.

Whitten, a visionary scholar and accomplished educator and researcher, will be the first female president for IU. She will oversee one of the nation's leading research universities at a time of record-level research funding and philanthropic support.

She first visited the IU East campus as president-elect on April 27.

Whitten holds a Ph.D. in communication studies from the University of Kansas, a Master of Arts in communication from the University of Kentucky and a Bachelor of Science in management from Tulane University. She is an internationally recognized expert in the field of telemedicine. As part of her work in higher education, she additionally held leadership roles at the University of Georgia and the University of Kansas Medical Center.

For more information on IU President Whitten, visit iu.edu/about/leadership/president/index.html.

Singles Interaction, Inc.

Posted October 22, 2021

Supplied Newsletter:  November 2021

If you are 21 years of age or better and single, divorced, widow or widower, Singles' Interaction invites you to join them on Friday nights. Come to the Eagles Lodge, 75 South 12th Street, Richmond (membership not required) and meet other single people in the Richmond area.

EverHeart Hospice Celebrates 40th Anniversary

Posted October 22, 2021

Supplied Photo: Everheart Hospice Staff Celebrates 40th Anniversary

EverHeart Hospice, formerly State of the Heart Care, is excited to be celebrating 40 years of caring for patients and families in the community.

In 1980, a small group of community members and healthcare professionals met to discuss the idea of starting a hospice program to serve patients facing a life-limiting illness. At the time, there was no such program available for local communities in a rural setting. This idea became a reality in January of 1981, with the official start of Hospice of Darke County, Inc. A total of 27 patients received care during that first year. Forty years later, we have now had the privilege of serving over 16,800 patients during their end-of-life journey.

Mary Sue Rosenberger was the first person employed by Hospice of Darke County, Inc., serving as Chief Executive Officer from 1981-1985. In a previous interview celebrating our 20 th Anniversary, Mary shared her thoughts on bringing a hospice program to the area, stating she knew the impact of the need for hospice care in the community was evident "when I visited my first patient. I knew then that this was an essential, meaningful service." Sadly, Mary has since passed away in 2020, but her legacy as one of the founding members and her passion for hospice care remains today.

Many aspects of the agency have grown and evolved over the years, from expanding office space from only two rooms in the basement of the Brethren Retirement Community in 1981, to currently having three offices located in Greenville and Coldwater, OH; Winchester, Indiana; and the EverHeart Hospice Care Center located on the fourth floor of Wayne HealthCare. Even through this growth, it is safe to say that the agency's mission, vision, and values have always remained deeply rooted and consistent. We are proud of our focus on our core values: Patient and Family-Centered, Compassion, Excellence, Integrity, and Community-Focused.

Over the years, when reflecting on her involvement with EverHeart Hospice since the very beginning, Joy Marchal, who served as the first Board President, second Chief Executive Officer for twelve years, and former volunteer after her retirement, previously shared, "There were mountains to climb and great challenges, but through it all we were able to make a significant difference for patients and families."

With the continuous hard work and dedication of our staff, volunteers, Board members, and generous community support, today we are proud to serve a total of 12 counties in west-central Ohio and east-central Indiana, including Darke, Miami, Preble, Shelby, Mercer, Auglaize, Allen, Van Wert, and Paulding counties in Ohio and Jay, Randolph, and Wayne counties in Indiana.

Kristi Strawser, current Chief Executive Officer since 2018, has been a part of the agency for many years serving in various roles prior including RN, Hospice Care Center Manager, and Chief Clinical Officer. "We are so very thankful for those who laid the foundation and advocated 40 years ago to introduce the concept of Hospice and the value of this service to our communities. We are honored to be continuing the mission of the organization. Our mission has been our focus for the past four decades, and we will continue ensuring that mission is our focus for decades to come."

Join us over the next 40 days as we reflect on the past 40 years, sharing the history and stories behind the roots of our organization. You can follow along on our website, www.everhearthospice.org, our Facebook page, and local media outlets.

We are proud to be your local non-profit hospice. When asked what the next 40 years may look like, Kristi shared, "We will continue ensuring our communities have access to exceptional hospice care to ensure those who are at this crucial part of their journey can experience quality of life and comfort. We will honor their life with trusted care."

IU East Announces 43rd Annual Whitewater Valley Art Competition Awards, Entrants

Posted October 19, 2021

Supplied Photo:  Benjamin Duke of East Lansing, Michigan, is the first-place winner of the 43rd Whitewater Valley Art Competition for his oil painting, Vicarious Causation.
Benjamin Duke of East Lansing, Michigan, is the first-place winner of the 43rd Whitewater Valley Art Competition for his oil painting, Vicarious Causation.

Jurors called the entries for this year's annual Whitewater Valley Art Competition (WVAC) thought provoking with a depth of talent and wide-range of mediums to immerse viewers into thought and discussion.

Originating in 1978 with open judging, the WVAC has hosted prestigious artists and art experts of national acclaim for the jurying.

Jurying for the 43rd WVAC was held on IU East Facebook Live on September 24.

Artwork was selected by this year's jurors Brigham Dimick, chair and professor for the Department of Art and Design at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville; Marcella Hackbardt, professor of Studio Art at Kenyon College; and Cathy Mayhugh, director of Exhibitions at the Fitton Center for Creative Arts.

Jurors selected the awards and entries for the WVAC announced during a reception on October 15.

Sixty-Six artists living in Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky, Michigan, and Ohio, working in a wide range of mediums including painting, drawing, ceramics, printmaking, fibers, sculpture, photography, and metalsmithing submitted 239 images featuring 193 works of art. After hours of individual review by jurors, Brigham Dimick, Cathy Mayhugh, and Marcella Hackbardt they selected 55 works of art created by forty-two artists for the final exhibition.

The 43rd Whitewater Valley Art exhibit is on display now through December 10 at in the Tom Thomas gallery and Meijer Artway, both located in Whitewater Hall.

The exhibition is presented by First Bank Richmond.

About the Jurors

Hackbardt is a visual artist, curator, and educator living in central Ohio. She is a professor of studio art at Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio. Her current work explores aspects of knowledge, self-reflection, the environment, and symbolic states. She received her M.F.A. in studio art/photography from the University Mexico, Albuquerque, and a B.A. in studio art from the University of Alaska Anchorage. Her work has been included in exhibitions at The Girl's Club Collection in Fort Lauderdale, Station Independent Projects in New York, Cleveland's Museum of Contemporary Art, and at The University of Notre Dame, among others.

Hackbardt has received recognition and support for her work from OAC Individual Excellence Grants, Kenyon College Faculty grants, the Midwest Society for Photographic Educators, and the Great Lakes Colleges Association.

"All of the works submitted sought to make meaning and challenge the viewer, and provided an exciting several hours of absorbing and discussing the rich messages and materiality of all of the entries, whether included in the final selection or not," Hackbardt said. "As a juror, I seek to recognize works that exhibit aesthetic, technical, and conceptual expertise--or that succeed and exceed in even one of these areas in a powerful way. My co-jurors also took time to reflect on each work, and through our discussions helped illuminate for me new ways of seeing and receiving the artworks, enriching my experience even further."

Dimick studied at the Barnstone Studios, a privately run atelier, as a teenager where he developed a portfolio that helped him earn a four-year scholarship to Tyler School of Art, where Dimick received a B.F.A. in painting. Before going to Indiana University for an M.F.A. in painting, Brigham spent four years hitchhiking across the country, living in northern California, traveling in Mexico, painting houses, and drawing.

His teaching career includes four years each at the Savannah College of Art and Design and the University of Pennyslvania, as well as years as a part-timer at Moore College of Art and St. Joseph's University. Since 2002, Brigham continues as the Drawing program head at SIUE and currently serves as chair of the department of Art and Design.

Some of his drawings are in the corporate collections of Morgan Stanley and Fische & Richardson, and in the university collections of Lamar University, Emporia State, and St. Ambrose University.

Dimick said the quality and breadth of submitted works were substantial and allowed the jurors to arrive at an exhibition that represents a wide range of sensibilities, technical processes, social and conceptual concerns while maintaining a satisfyingly high standard.

"As a juror, I try to see beyond my personal tastes and approach each artwork on its own terms. Hence, the question is not whether I like the work, but whether it is compelling on the terms the artist set, and whether the work is bold enough to go beyond the familiar while exhibiting a command of visual syntax," Dimick said. "I found myself most drawn to work in which an artist's range of entries reinforced their underlying concerns foundational to their creative practice. A common denominator of these impactful artists was the balancing act of making each work a fresh adventure while ensuring that the collective impact of their portfolio reveals a larger and enduring focus."

Mayhugh has been the Director of Exhibitions at the Fitton Center for Creative Arts in Hamilton, Ohio, since 2000. In this role she curates, designs, coordinates and installs a wide range of exhibitions of visual art. She also leads gallery talks, creates community collaborative projects and serves on Hamilton's StreetSpark Mural Selection Committee. After years of collaborating with other artists to present their work, she is reemerging as an art maker herself.

Mayhugh holds a B.F.A. in Painting from Miami University and a Graduate Certificate in Museum Studies from the University of Cincinnati, DAAP.

"A diversity of artistic materials and processes and obvious abundant talent made judging this regional exhibition both a challenge and a joy," Mayhugh said. "Brigham, Marcella and I agreed that we wanted to select and award artworks that would strongly represent the range of media we encountered and include both abstract and representational content."

IU East's 43rd Annual Whitewater Valley Art Competition Top Entrants

First Place ($2,000 award and a 2022 IU East galleries solo exhibition invitation)

  • Benjamin Duke, East Lansing, Michigan - Vicarious Causation, oil

Second Place

  • John Humphries, Cincinnati, Ohio - Calvino's Ten Forgotten Cities, cut paper, pencil

Third Place

  • Charles Mintz, Cleveland, Ohio - "The Flower Man" Evansville, IN, inkjet print from scanned film

Honorable Mention

  • Steve Loar, East Grand Rapids, Michigan - Inner Vistas # 2, found and gifted materials, mostly wood
  • Devan Horton, Bellevue, Kentucky - Wade, oil on canvas
  • Sam Kelly, Dayton, Ohio - Two Figures and the Muybridge Horse, charcoal, paper collage on paper

Chancellor's Choice Purchase Award (IU East Campus Art Collection)

Nathan Taves, Columbia City, Indiana - Pasture Canyons, oil on panel

In addition to the award winners, work from the following artists is included in this exhibition:

Shelby Alexander, Cincinnati, Ohio; Abby Beneke, West Alexandria, Ohio; Walt Bistline, Richmond, Indiana; Gregory Bryant, Lafayette, Indiana; Susan Carlson, Cincinnati, Ohio; Hector Del Campo, Westfield, Indiana; Casey Dressel, Cincinnati, Ohio; Claire Fullam, Indianapolis, Indiana; Carl Gay, Richmond, Indiana; Nicholas Hill, Granville, Ohio; Angie Hubbard, Alexandria, Kentucky; Ann Johnson, Muncie, Indiana; Erica Keener, West Alexandria, Ohio; Colleen Kelsey, Oakwood, Ohio; Amy Kollar Anderson, Dayton, Ohio; Michael Lorsung, Muncie, Indiana; Josh Lovitt, Richmond, Indiana; Steven C. Meyer, Porter, Indiana; Rob Millard-Mendez, Evansville, Indiana; Kathy A. Moore, Casstown, Ohio; Paloma Nunez-Regueiro, Ann Arbor, Michigan; Jim Pearson, Lawrenceville, Illinois; Kate Santucci, Dayton, Ohio; Francis Schanberger, Dayton, Ohio; Constance Scopelitis, Indianapolis, Indiana; Neil Simak, College Corner, Ohio; Barb Stahl, Indianapolis, Indiana; Joseph Swanson, Richmond, Indiana; Nancy Taylor, Richmond, Indiana; Jerry D. Thompson, Richmond, Indiana; Barbara Triscari, Lebanon, Indiana; Mark Van Buskirk, Richmond, Indiana; Cass Waters, Chicago, Illinois; and Clinton Wood, Cincinnati, Ohio.

IU East's School of Business and Economics Business Speaker Series begins October 20

Posted October 19, 2021

Indiana University East's School of Business and Economics Business Speaker Series will begin at 11 a.m. on Wednesday, October 20, in Vivian Auditorium. The presentation is free and open to the public.

The Business Speaker Series is sponsored by the Charles Koch Foundation. Co-sponsored by Delta Mu Delta, IU East Center for Economic Education, and the IU East Business and Economic Research Center.

Supplied Photo:  Sean Mulholland
Sean Mulholland
The first speaker this fall is Sean Mulholland, professor of economics at Western Carolina University in Cullowhee, North Carolina.

Mulholland's presentation is "Test-Optional Admissions and Student Debt."

Applicants who forgo submitting standardized test scores signal that they have fewer enrollment options. Facing fewer competitors, test-optional schools can charge more. They find that private school graduates admitted under a test-optional policy borrow $1,410 (2016) more than those required to submit their scores. This amount represents about 5 percent of the average debt of bachelor's degree holders.

As the number of test-optional schools have increased, each successive post-switching graduating class borrows less. They also show that the share of graduates with debt drops after the switch to test-optional admissions but rises as the number of test-optional competitors increases.

Mulholland has published research articles on a wide variety of topics, including human capital and economic growth, white supremacist groups and hate crimes, school competition and student performance, and Uber and drunk driving. His research has appeared in many journals, including the Journal of Economic Growth, Public Choice, Economics Letters, and Economics of Education Review. His co-authored paper, "Ride-Sharing, Fatal Crashes, and Crime" was awarded the Georgescu-Roegen Prize for the best academic article published in the Southern Economic Journal in 2018. His work has been covered by Ballotpedia, Politifact, National Review, and Tyler Cowen on marginalrevolution.com.

He was awarded the 2018-2019 College of Business Faculty Excellence Award, the 2017-2018 Honors College Board of Directors Faculty Excellence Award, and the 2017-2018 College of Business Excellence in Research Award. He has held faculty positions at Boston College, Stonehill College, and Mercer University. Mulholland has guided more than a dozen undergraduate research projects. He has served as a faculty mentor at seminars sponsored by the Institute for Humane Studies (IHS) and the Foundation for Economic Education (FEE) and led discussions at the Center for Excellence in Education's Research Science Institute at MIT.

Born and raised in Anderson, South Carolina, Mulholland earned his M.A. and Ph.D. from Clemson University. He lives in Franklin, North Carolina with his wife, Western Carolina University economist Angela K. Dills, and their three children.

Supplied Photo:  Percy Menzies
Percy Menzies

The Business Speaker Series will present its second speaker, Percy Menzies, president of assisted Recovery Centers of America, at 10:15 a.m. on Wednesday, November 10, in Vivian Auditorium. This lecture is co-sponsored with the IU East School of Nursing and Health Sciences.

Menzies will present "Treating the Addicted Brain: Advances in the Treatment of Addictive Disorders."

The treatment of addictive disorders, especially alcoholism and opioid addiction has a dark history of using medications, devices and surgeries that did more harm than good. This was primarily due to the lack of understanding of the neurobiology of addiction and failure to understand the reciprocity of using addicting drugs as cures. The result of this dark history is a mistrust of science and medicine and the dominance of self-help groups in the treatment of addictive disorders.

The advances in the understanding of neurobiology and behavioral sciences have led to the development of newer medications and therapies which will bring treatment in line with other chronic conditions like diabetes and hypertension.

The Assisted Recovery Centers of America, LLC, is a center for the treatment of alcoholism and drug addiction based in St. Louis, Missouri which was established in 2001.

Menzies' interest and passion for pharmacological treatment of drug addiction and alcoholism goes back to the early eighties when naltrexone was first introduced for the treatment of heroin addiction. He worked for over 18 years for DuPont Pharmaceuticals in various positions and had responsibility for naltrexone as the associate product director.

Menzies has worked closely with drugs courts and provided training on the use of anticraving medications to reduce recidivism within the criminal justice population addicted to alcohol and opioids. He has conducted workshops for a wide range of audiences both in the U.S. and overseas on evidenced-based treatments for addictive disorders.

He has been invited to serve on expert committees to develop guidelines for the treatment of addictive disorders and alcoholism. He has been invited to serve on advisory boards both in the private and government sectors.

Menzies holds a master's degree in pharmacy from India. Menzies immigrated to the United States in 1977.

Doctors Will Be Back to Answer COVID-19 Questions Thursday Night

Posted October 19, 2021

There's been quite a bit of news recently around COVID-19 vaccinations and booster shots, so Whitewater Community Television once again is offering a chance for you to get your questions answered by local experts live Thursday evening.

WCTV's "IN Focus" program will feature Thomas Huth, M.D., Vice President of Medical Affairs for Reid Health; David Jetmore, M.D., Wayne County Health Officer; and Paul Rider, M.D., Wayne County Health Board President at 6 p.m. Thursday.

Huth and Jetmore were the featured guests of WCTV's "Ask the Doctors" program that ran for some 65 weeks from the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic through the middle of June. The duo has been featured on "IN Focus" three times since "Ask the Doctors" ended, most recently on Sept. 23.

If you have a question you'd like to have answered during the program, it can be emailed to WCTV at WCTV@iue.edu by 4 p.m. Thursday. During the show, questions can be posed by asking on the WCTV Facebook page or by sending them via Twitter to @WCTVinfo.

"IN Focus" airs Thursdays at 6 p.m. on WGTV, Channel 11 on Comcast cable in Wayne County. Those who live outside Wayne County or who don't have Comcast can watch the show live on WCTV's Facebook page as well as on WGTV Online.

Replays can be seen on WGTV, Channel 11, Thursday at 10:30 p.m., Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 8 a.m. and 9 p.m., and Sunday at 8 a.m. and 1 p.m. Audio-only replays can be heard Sunday mornings on G101.3 and sister station ESPN Radio 1490 & 100.9 WKBV.

A recording of the program also is available on WGTV Online in the "Video on Demand" section.

Today's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 32
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 24 (75%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 9
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 8 (88.9%
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 8
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 7 (87.5%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 167
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 21 (12.6% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 17

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Help LifeStream Deliver Hope to Isolated Seniors

Posted October 19, 2021

LifeStream Services is seeking support from the community to help deliver hope to older adults who are isolated and alone during the holidays with AngelWish. AngelWish is an annual program that coordinates the doorstep delivery of special gifts to isolated seniors in Blackford, Delaware, Fayette, Franklin, Grant, Henry, Jay, Madison, Randolph, Rush, Union, and Wayne counties. This is often the only visit and gift the recipients will receive during the holidays.

For over 20 years, the AngelWish program has delivered gifts to hundreds of seniors during the holiday season. This is made possible by the generosity of community businesses, clubs, churches, and individuals who ensure the most vulnerable are not forgotten during the holidays. Due to the continued threat of COVID-19, AngelWish recipients will receive a pre-packaged gift set that includes a combination of home safety items and holiday treats.

Below is how individuals and organizations can support AngelWish and isolated seniors:

  • Make a monetary donation: With just a $30 donation, a senior will receive a gift box. Donations can be made online at lifestreaminc.org/angelwish or mailed to 1701 Pilgrim Blvd. Yorktown, IN 47396. Please note AngelWish with the donation. Checks should be made payable to LifeStream Services.
  • Sign up to be a delivery elf: LifeStream expects to deliver 1,000 gift boxes between December 6 and December 24. Dependable volunteers are needed to help deliver the gift boxes to AngelWish recipients to ensure all boxes are delivered by December 24. People of all ages can volunteer. Volunteers under the age of 18 must be accompanied by an adult. Learn more or sign up at lifestreaminc.org/angelwish or contact Laura Bray, Volunteer Services Administrator, at 765-759-3372 or lbray@lifestreaminc.org.
  • Become a sponsor: Sponsorships start at $100 and go up to $2,000. Benefits can include logo and name listed on print and online materials, mentioned in e-newsletters, and the opportunity to provide promotional materials in the gift boxes. Sign up to sponsor AngelWish at lifestreaminc.org/angelwish or contact Angie Jenkins, Outreach Coordinator, at 765-759-1121 or ajenkins@lifestreaminc.org.

Learn more about the AngelWish program and its impact on isolated seniors at lifestreaminc.org/angelwish.

Micaela Knox Joins Model T Museum as Museum and Education Coordinator

Posted October 19, 2021

The Model T Museum welcomes Micaela Knox as the new Museum and Education Coordinator. Knox brings an ambitious passion for the museum sector with three years' experience in museums and gallery spaces and a background in public relations.

Knox served the David Owsley Museum of Art until late 2020, where they developed skills in strategic communication as the institution's public relations intern and honed an understanding of education as a visitor's assistant and docent. Knox also brings education and programming experience from roles at the Boys and Girls Club, Inspire Academy, and the Purdue University Northwest CHESS Art Gallery.

Knox gained a bachelor of arts in public relations and events management from Ball State University in December 2020 and is pursuing a graduate certificate in museum studies from IUPUI.

"We are so pleased to have Micaela join our staff," said Rachel Hughes, Executive Director of the Model T Ford Club, the non-profit that owns and operates the Museum. "Micaela has already offered ideas that will enhance our current programming and bring new and exciting exhibits to the Museum."

"Small museums are facing hardships right now in the post-quarantine world," Knox said. "I want to help bring people back to the Museum and also work to reposition the Model T Museum to have a greater presence in the Richmond community."

Of their goals in expanding the museum's educational offerings, Knox is determined to collaborate with the city of Richmond's traditional education community and design tours which address topics of diversity, industrialization, and specialized education through the perspective of the Model T Ford.

Knox can be reached by email at micaela@mtfca.com or on LinkedIn at linkedin.com/in/knoxmicaela.

The Model T Museum is located in the Historic Depot District in Richmond, Ind., at 309 N. 8th St. Free public parking is available onsite. For more information on hours and admission prices, please call (765) 488-0026 or visit mtfca.com/museum.

Which COVID-19 Vaccine Is Right for You?

Posted October 19, 2021

Three COVID-19 vaccines have been approved for use in the United States by federal health officials, and it can be a little confusing in trying to choose which one to get.

Here's a breakdown of each vaccine -- Pfizer, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson -- including information about who's eligible to get each one, how many doses you'll need, how each works, and more.

Regardless of which vaccine you choose, all three are safe, effective, and reduce your risk of severe illness from COVID-19.

Pfizer
  • Who can get it? Anyone 12 years and older
  • How many shots do you need? Two, given 21 days apart for most people. Those who are moderately to severely immunocompromised should get a third shot at least 28 days after their second.
  • When are you considered fully vaccinated? Two weeks after your second dose
  • How does it work? The vaccine uses mRNA to give instructions to your cells about how to make a harmless spike protein that is found on the surface of the virus that causes COVID-19. The spike protein triggers your body's immune response, allowing it to build immunity against the virus. Once the instructions are passed on, your cells get rid of the mRNA. It never enters the nucleus of the cells where the DNA resides.
  • Will I need a booster? Booster shots are recommended for anyone 65 and older as well as those 18 and older who meet certain guidelines. The booster shot should come at least six months after the second.
  • Has it been fully approved by the FDA? The FDA has given the Pfizer vaccine full approval for those 18 and older. It remains available under an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) for those ages 12-17.
Moderna
  • Who can get it? Anyone 18 years and older
  • How many shots do you need? Two, given 28 days apart for most people. However, as with the Pfizer vaccine, those who are moderately to severely immunocompromised should get a third dose at least 28 days after their second.
  • When are you considered fully vaccinated? Two weeks after your second dose
  • How does it work? The Moderna vaccine uses the same mRNA technology as Pfizer's.
  • Will I need a booster? An advisory group for the FDA on Thursday unanimously recommended booster shots for the same groups of people now eligible for a Pfizer booster, but a final decision has not been made yet. The CDC's advisory panel is scheduled to meet next week.
  • Has it been fully approved by the FDA? Not yet. It remains available for use under an EUA.
Johnson & Johnson
  • Who can get it? Anyone 18 years and older
  • How many shots do you need? One. Johnson & Johnson has not been given approval for an additional does for those who are moderately to severely immunocompromised.
  • When are you considered fully vaccinated? Two weeks after your shot
  • How does it work? Johnson & Johnson's vaccine is a viral vector vaccine. It operates in much the same way as Pfizer's and Moderna's except instead of using mRNA to deliver the instructions for making the COVID-19 spike protein, Johnson & Johnson's vaccine uses a modified version of a different virus. Like the other vaccines, the material does not integrate into a person's DNA.
  • Will I need a booster? The FDA's advisory panel today unanimously recommended a booster shot for everyone who has received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, but the CDC still must weigh in before they are approved. That won't happen until next week.
  • Has it been fully approved by the FDA? Not yet. It remains available for use under an EUA.

FREE COVID-19 vaccinations are available at a number of nearby locations. Indiana residents can find sites and sign up for an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

Today's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 43
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 31 (72.1%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 8
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 7 (87.5%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 6
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 5 (83.3%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 196
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 27 (13.8% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 17

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Posted October 19, 2021

Supplied Photo: Sign in front of a buildingNew Memorial Signs have been installed at each of EverHeart Hospice's office locations. Their offices are located in Greenville and Coldwater, OH, Winchester Indiana, and in the EverHeart Hospice Care Center located on the 4th floor of Wayne Healthcare in Greenville, OH.

Around Memorial Day, families were sent letters inviting them to remember their loved ones by having their names added to the memorial signs. Additionally, individuals and groups can also be honored on these signs, not just Hospice patients. Donations for the sign are always welcome but are not required to honor a loved one who has been lost or a special person or group.

Sarah Depoy, the Bereavement Coordinator for EverHeart Hospice, shared, "It is exciting to share our new signs with our communities as a way to honor a life lived, a life shared, a life loved, and a life who has touched others."

This year the Memorial Sign reflects the new brand as State of the Heart Care transitioned to EverHeart Hospice. The design of the sign is soft and invites the viewer to take a moment to peacefully reflect on the meaning of the sign. Also on the sign is a butterfly, which is often symbolic of the spiritual journey.

Jacque Collins is a Chaplain at Everheart Hospice and spends time speaking with patients and families experiencing the end-of-life journey or grieving a loss. She noted, "We all need somebody to listen and provide comfort while our hearts are mending." The signs are just one space for this process to occur and anyone is welcome to visit the signs for a moment of reflection.

Erica Wood, Business Development Specialist, helped coordinate the sign project. She says, "Our hope is that families feel welcome to take a moment and visit our memorial signs outside each of our offices. It's a great way to remember loved ones and reflect on special memories that may bring a tear to your eye, but also a smile to your face." 

Families and individuals are offered Bereavement Services for 13 months following the passing of their loved ones. These services are provided by EverHeart Hospice free of charge thanks to the generosity of donations to the agency. Bereavement services are available to anyone in the community who is grieving, not just those who have lost someone who received hospice care.

Those interested in learning more about Bereavement Support can call EverHeart Hospice at 1-800-417-7535 or visit their website at everhearthospice.org.

A Few Key Reminders About COVID-19 Testing and What Should Happen After the Test

Posted October 7, 2021

With COVID-19 case counts still high, it's a good time to review what should happen when someone tests positive for the virus, especially considering some of the guidance from federal health officials has changed since the pandemic's early days thanks to the presence of vaccines.

I tested negative

A negative result likely means you don't have COVID-19, or at least you didn't at the time your sample was collected. You should consult your school/workplace policies to find out whether you can return to your normal schedule.

I tested positive

All those who test positive for COVID-19 -- whether fully vaccinated or not -- should isolate from others for at least 10 days from either their first day of symptoms or the day of their positive test, whichever was earlier.

The Indiana Department of Health's page on contact tracing says you can spread COVID-19 two days before you begin to have symptoms. Once you test positive, you should reach out to anyone you've been in close contact with so they can begin their quarantine. Close contact is defined as being within 6 feet for a total of 15 minutes or more over a 24-hour period.

If you don't have symptoms, you should reach out to any close contacts from the 48 hours before you were tested. If you do have symptoms, it's the 48 hours before you developed those symptoms.

I've been exposed to someone who tested positive

Anyone who is not fully vaccinated who has been in close contact with someone who has COVID-19 should quarantine for 14 days.

Those who are fully vaccinated -- anyone who has received both doses of a two-dose vaccine such as Pfizer or Moderna or the single-dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine -- do not need to quarantine after exposure unless the vaccinated person is symptomatic.

Fully vaccinated people should get tested 3-5 days after their exposure even if they don't have symptoms and wear a mask in public for 14 days after exposure or until they get a negative test result.

What should I be on the lookout for now that I've tested positive?

Those who have complications typically see them in the second week or about eight days after the onset of symptoms. Watch for worsening symptoms and don't delay contacting your primary care provider should they appear.

According to the CDC, if you have trouble breathing, persistent pain or pressure in your chest, new confusion, an inability to wake up or stay awake, or pale, gray, or blue-colored skin, lips, or nail beds, seek emergency medical care immediately. Call 911 or go to the nearest Emergency Room.

If you need to schedule a COVID-19 test or are looking for your results, call Reid Health's COVID hotline at (765) 965-4200. The hotline is available 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. seven days a week to help with testing and those who need clinical advice.

Today's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 48
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 38 (79.2%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 9
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 9 (100%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 5
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 5 (100%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 339
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 32 (9.4% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 14

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Foundation Announces Finalists for 2022 Lilly Endowment Community Scholarship

Posted October 11, 2021

The Wayne County Foundation is pleased to announce that among a pool of 79 highly competitive applicants, five high school seniors who attend Wayne County schools have been selected as finalists for the 2022 Lilly Endowment Community Scholarship.

  • Emily Cox, Lincoln High School
  • Esther Etherington, Richmond High School
  • Devin Frazier, Centerville High School
  • Shayna Morris, Lincoln High School
  • Garrett Walther, Centerville High School

From the five finalists, two will be awarded the scholarship. The applications were thoroughly reviewed and independently scored by members of the Foundation's selection committee. In selecting the finalists, consideration was given for a student's activities, achievements, community service, academic performance, financial need, work experience, and leadership potential.

Finalists will be interviewed in October and interview scores will determine the finalists' rankings. The committee's recommendations will be submitted to Independent Colleges of Indiana, Inc. for final review of the scholarship recipients. The 2022 Lilly Endowment Community Scholars for Wayne County will be announced in December 2021.

Lilly Endowment Community Scholars are awarded a four-year, full-tuition scholarship to pursue baccalaureate degrees at colleges or universities in the state Indiana. The scholarship also includes up to $900 annually for required textbooks and equipment. To date, more than 50 Wayne County students have been awarded the scholarship since the program began in 1998.

For more information on the Lilly Endowment Community Scholarship or other scholarships administered by Wayne County Foundation, visit https://waynecountyfoundation.org/ or contact Alex Painter, Community Engagement Officer, at 765-962-1638.

Senior Adult Ministry October Meeting

Posted October 11, 2021

Do you have questions about Hospice Care? Then attend the next meeting of the Senior Adult Ministry which will be held at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, October 26, at First United Methodist Church, 318 National Road West, Richmond, IN.

Bring snacks to share and invite a friend for a presentation by Valerie King from Premier Hospice Health Care.

Senior Adult Ministry is an active group of seniors over 50 years old open to all regardless of religious affiliation. The group is guided by Pastor Judi Marshall, Clara Bulmer and Beverly Kirby. These three women actively share their gifts of ministry, hospitality and creativity in planning and organizing the monthly meetings.

For further information, call 765-962-4357.

Applications are Open for Next Generation Hoosier Educators Scholarship

Posted October 11, 2021

Students have until January 31, 2022 to apply for renewable $7,500 scholarship

(INDIANAPOLIS) – High-achieving high school and college students who are planning to teach in the State of Indiana for at least five years can apply for a $7,500 scholarship per year of college (up to $30,000 total) through the Next Generation Hoosier Educators Scholarship program.

The Indiana Commission for Higher Education is encouraging students to act quickly, as there are only 200 scholarships available and the deadline to apply is January 31, 2022. Interested students should apply at ScholarTrack.IN.gov.

"Everyone has a story about a great teacher who changed their lives for the better. We need more of these change agents in Indiana's classrooms," said Dr. Katie Jenner, Indiana Secretary of Education. "The Next Generation Hoosier Educators Scholarship is elevating the importance of this lifelong impact with a meaningful scholarship to help support Indiana's best and brightest as they pursue a career in education."

This scholarship is making a difference at building Indiana's teacher pipeline. Nearly 90 percent of scholarship recipients from the inaugural 2017 cohort are either continuing their education or have already become licensed teachers actively making an impact for Hoosier students.

To qualify for the scholarship, students must have either graduated in the top 20 percent of their high school class or earned a score in the top 20th percentile on the SAT (1190) or ACT (26). To continue earning the scholarship in college, students must file a Free Application for Federal Student Aid each year, earn a 3.0 cumulative GPA and complete at least 30 credit hours per year. Current college students who apply must be able to use the scholarship for at least two full academic years.

"The Next Generation Hoosier Educators Scholarship not only assists future educators in funding their higher education, but it helps keep those who become licensed teaching in Indiana," said Indiana Commissioner for Higher Education Teresa Lubbers. "We look forward to the positive impact these educators will have on their students and on Indiana's teacher pipeline."

The Commission will review all applications and notify applicants of their scholarship status via email by March 18, 2022.Supplied Photo:  Maylee Barriger

A total of 438 students applied for the 2021-22 Next Generation Hoosier Educators Scholarship, with applications from 229 high schools in 84 of Indiana's 92 counties. Nearly three-quarters of applicants were Indiana high school seniors with the remainder comprised of current college students.

Maylee Barriger, a recent graduate from Hauser Jr.-Sr. High School in Hope, Indiana, is one of the 2020-21 scholarship recipients. Barriger is currently attending Indiana University-Purdue University Columbus where she's pursuing a major in elementary education with an endorsement for middle school math. Upon graduation, she wants to teach at either her former Jr.-Sr. high school or Hope Elementary.

"I was super nervous to go to college because I was not sure I could afford it," said Barriger. "I'm really thankful for this scholarship because it's given me the opportunity to stay at home and be close to my family, work to save money and be involved in my community in new ways I was not able to in high school."

Visit www.LearnMoreIndiana.org/NextTeacher for more information on how to apply and follow #NextTeacher on social media. Questions may be directed to NextTeacher@che.in.gov.

For questions about state financial aid, students can contact the Indiana Commission for Higher Education by phone at 888-528-4719 or via email at awards@che.in.gov.

Caregivers Invited to Drive-Thru Appreciation Events

Posted October 4, 2021

LifeStream Services invites caregivers to the Caregiver Drive-Thru Appreciation events in celebration of National Family Caregivers Month in November. Caregivers can drive-thru to receive helpful caregiver resources from local organizations and a sweet treat.

Registration is not required and there is no fee to attend this event. CDC guidelines will be in place to keep the events safe for the community. LifeStream will host two events in Connersville and Richmond:

  • Richmond Caregiver Drive-Thru Appreciation: Wednesday, November 3 from 11:00am to noon at The Leland Legacy located at 900 S. A St. Richmond, IN 47374.
  • Connersville Caregiver Drive-Thru Appreciation: Wednesday, November 10 from 11:00am to noon at Majestic Care of Connersville located at 1029 E. 5th St. Connersville, IN 47331.
LifeStream Services recognizes the importance of family caregivers and the sacrifices they make to keep their loved one(s) safe and healthy. This event is one way LifeStream and partners can give back to those who give so much. For more information regarding caregiver resources provided by LifeStream or the Caregiver Drive-Thru Appreciation events, please contact Angie Jenkins, Outreach Coordinator, at 765-759-1121 or ajenkins@lifestreaminc.org. More information at lifestreaminc.org.

2021 Girls Inc. Signature Event to be Held on November 13th

Posted September 22, 2021

Supplied Image: Girl in Cape

Girls Inc. of Wayne County invites you to the 2021 Girls Inc. Signature Event on Saturday, November 13, 2021 at 6:00 p.m. at the Forest Hills Country Club, 6139 South 23rd Street, Richmond, IN 47374.

The event will honor:

  • Ann Brooks: 20 plus years at Harrington Hoch
  • Becky Jewison: Retired from Reid after 10 years
  • Ella Watson: 11 year old Studen and Girls Inc. member

Tickets are $75 each. Cocktail attire.

Purchase a tribute ad to honor someone who you see as a hero or to Congratulate the honorees.

For Tribute details, please RSVP to msoper@girlsincwayne.org by October 25th.

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Did You Know?

The first high school orchestra in the nation was established at Morton High School in Richmond, Indiana in 1899 by Joseph Edgar Maddy.